Category Archives: Peace

Making the Connection

onamission

Tomorrow, we have a conversation that has been almost 10 months in the making.

Late last year, Madeline joined our Advocacy Committee.  She spoke about stitching together stories and creating space.  That conversation led to many about the placemaking that is happening here at the YW.  Conversations that helped us to expand our ideas about social and racial justice to include the economy and people who are system involved, environmental work around water and imagining a more just and peaceful world community.  We spoke and thought about food, jobs, art, immigrants, leadership, and how we can imagine working outside of the multiple silos that exist; silos that that do not reflect the complex lives that we, or the communities that we work in solidarity with, lead on a daily basis.

Tim took up the banner of wanting to have dialogue between folx that are working in Social Justice and those that work in Environmental Justice.  What would it look, sound and feel like to have them speaking together, in public.  What sparks might occur?  What collaborations might emerge?  This is a continuation of the work that the Southern Arizona Green For All Coalition began years ago. We hope that it is one of many such conversations to continue into the future.

At a recent retreat, our Board and Staff wondered what might be said about our work in 100 years.  A long time board member, said something that made everyone take a moment and rethink everything.  (I paraphrase) They cared and worked to make change to protect the environment and the planet.  We realized that without a fierce eye on the challenge at hand, namely, to confront and transform the economic and political systems that violate our most basic human rights and threaten the survival of our planet–our vision of a thriving community is incomplete.  So, we are working and thinking differently.  It is clear that these connections are not new but it is critical that we all begin to think a lot bigger and much more expansively in order to address the many issues that our communities face. Together, we have a lot of work to do, and the YW Southern Arizona has a vision of how we are going to chart a course for a second century of change.

We hope to see you tomorrow and as always we hope to hear your thoughts.

What:  Environmental Justice & Social Justice: Making the Connection Supporting One Another – Enhancing Our Effectiveness  (A Program of the YWCA Advocacy Committee)
When:  Wednesday, October 19, 2016 6:00 – 8:00 pm
Where:   YWCA of Southern Arizona 525 N. Bonita Avenue Tucson, AZ
Who:  Social Justice Organizations:  Blue Corn Project/UA, Mt. Calvary Baptist Church Social Justice Ministries, Tierra Y Libertad Organization/Changemaker HS, Community Food Bank 
Environmental Organizations:  Center for Biological Diversity  National Parks Conservation Asso. Saguaro National Park Sierra Club  Sky Island Alliance
How Much:  Free/Open to the Public
For Additional Information: Tim Wernette (520) 615-3405; timwernette@msn.com

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Filed under Eliminating Racism, Empowering Women, Justice, Peace

Race to Justice Book Club-Oct 12, 2016

We are feeling the weight of Baldwin’s words today as we watch our brothers and sisters struggle for survival in Haiti.  His conversations around time, kingdom, Equalité, empire, all ring as we watch the desperation of families who need water and food.    We send our thoughts to you.
His invocation of personal responsibility hit my heart as I see the events in the world today.  His voice of 1963 rings in my mind as I consider that we must proceed with courage and strength in the pursuit of justice.  
In Community,
-Liane

We started this book club as a means of having a common language to share ideas around race.  Our first text, New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander yielded a great conversation that continues in our work at the YWCA.  The last month has seen the convening of our 7th panel/community conversation on the issue of mass incarceration and this week we eagerly await the American Friends Service Committee’s storytelling event led by our friend, Dr. Grace Gamez. We hope to see you there.

Entre Suenos: Voices from the Inside/Out by Reframing Justice                                                 October 15, 6:30; $5 at the door
Entre Suenos: Voices from the Inside/Out by Reframing Justice Theatre.

A live storytelling theatrical event featuring six storytellers who share one thing in common: all have experienced Arizona’s criminal punishment system. Three of the storytellers are currently incarcerate and three are now navigating life on the ‘outside’.
When
Sat Oct 15, 2016
Where
YWCA Tucson, 525 N Bonita Ave, Tucson, AZ 85745

This work has become a calling for us.  Together, Sara and I spend much of our time discussing the interventions that we can make to help raise voices and make spaces for people who are system involved here at the YW and at the Pima County ReEntry Coalition. The book club session around Alexander’s book helped our colleagues and friends see the connections between our Anti-racism work and the struggle to eliminate our carceral state.

This month, our text is Baldwin’s classic, The Fire Next Time.

In this text, we see the articulation of so many themes and concepts that Alexander championed in the previous text.  We see Baldwin utilize concepts that Dubois articulated in 1891 quoting Douglass from 1881. We see that the messages, struggles, pain and resistance of yesterday not only does, but must, inform the struggles for resistance of today.

In reading and listening to this text, the frustrations and pain of the personal are also articulated in such clear and beautiful language that I found myself in tears at times.  The soul of the artist is revealed in his recounting of his struggle with faith, love, choices and place in the world.  We hope that you will join us, but if you can not please do take the opportunity to read this text.    We look forward to our conversation this morning and we hope that you will gather your friends to your table and have this conversation as well.

Here are a couple of documents to help out that Sara has put together.  Join our conversations, have your own.  Together, we can make a difference.

In fact, we believe that ONLY together will we make real systemic change and help to shape a future of peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all.  Let us know what you think.

book-club2bookclub_baldwin

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Filed under Eliminating Racism, Justice, Peace

BLM and Anger

 

I have the incredible opportunity to work with 2 fantastically intelligent and accomplished interns from the ASU School of Social Work, Sara Galaz and Valerie Denogean.  Together, with our colleagues from the Latina Leadership Initiative, led by Alba Jaramillo,  we are working on the Racial Justice and Human Rights for the YWCA of Southern Arizona.  Valerie and Sara are taking a respite this week as part of their Fall Break, but Valerie sends this postcard to us from North Carolina, where she attended undergraduate. We send the families and communities of North Carolina and Haiti our thoughts and hopes for real recovery.
Thank you for your support and we look forward to your comments,
In Community,
-Liane

 

Greensboro, North Carolina was my home during undergrad. It is a beautiful city with beautiful culture. I love the South. However, the news right now from North Carolina is troubling. I have friends and peers protesting in Charlotte because of police brutality. Additionally, recently Greensboro police have been criticized for targeting African Americans.

The worst part is that I cannot say I am surprised. The South is where millions of African Americans were forced into slavery, where the KKK originated, and where confederate flags are still proudly flown. Unfortunately, racism is deeply rooted in Southern history and culture. This has resulted in the loss of African American lives in the hands of the police.

So often I hear people describe the Black Lives Matters (BLM) protesters as angry, immature and/or as thugs. The only one of those descriptors I would agree with for the Black Lives Matter group is angry.

And I have to ask is it any wonder that they are angry? Is it any wonder my friends in Charlotte are angry when police target them and harass them? Is it any wonder they are angry when this leads to injuries and/or death?

In “The Uses of Anger” Audre Lorde wrote, “My response to racism is anger. I have lived with that anger, on that anger, beneath that anger, on top of that anger, ignoring that anger, feeding upon that anger, learning to use that anger before it laid my visions to waste, for most of my life. Once I did it in silence, afraid of the weight of that anger. My fear of that anger taught me nothing. Your fear of that anger will teach you nothing, also. Women responding to racism means women responding to anger, the anger of exclusion, of unquestioned privilege, of racial distortions, of silence, ill-use, stereotyping, defensiveness, misnaming, betrayal, and coopting”.

Anger is not always a bad thing. Anger is a powerful force and to be angry as a woman or a member of minority group is akin to being alive. I offer my solidarity to the Black Lives Matter movement and hope that they succeed in channeling anger into real and lasting change.

Valerie Denogean is MSW PAC student at ASU. She was born and raised in Tucson. She is interested in prison-reform, immigration, education-reform, politics, inequalities because of race and gender. However, currently she is interested in Eco-Feminism and how the treatment of women connects with the state of the environment, the treatment of animals, and our food. Valerie likes to run, hike and swim. She swam competitively for the Guilford College Quaker Swim team. She likes to travel and hopes to use her Social Work Degree in Northern Virginia after graduation.

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Filed under Eliminating Racism, Justice, Peace