BLM and Anger

 

I have the incredible opportunity to work with 2 fantastically intelligent and accomplished interns from the ASU School of Social Work, Sara Galaz and Valerie Denogean.  Together, with our colleagues from the Latina Leadership Initiative, led by Alba Jaramillo,  we are working on the Racial Justice and Human Rights for the YWCA of Southern Arizona.  Valerie and Sara are taking a respite this week as part of their Fall Break, but Valerie sends this postcard to us from North Carolina, where she attended undergraduate. We send the families and communities of North Carolina and Haiti our thoughts and hopes for real recovery.
Thank you for your support and we look forward to your comments,
In Community,
-Liane

 

Greensboro, North Carolina was my home during undergrad. It is a beautiful city with beautiful culture. I love the South. However, the news right now from North Carolina is troubling. I have friends and peers protesting in Charlotte because of police brutality. Additionally, recently Greensboro police have been criticized for targeting African Americans.

The worst part is that I cannot say I am surprised. The South is where millions of African Americans were forced into slavery, where the KKK originated, and where confederate flags are still proudly flown. Unfortunately, racism is deeply rooted in Southern history and culture. This has resulted in the loss of African American lives in the hands of the police.

So often I hear people describe the Black Lives Matters (BLM) protesters as angry, immature and/or as thugs. The only one of those descriptors I would agree with for the Black Lives Matter group is angry.

And I have to ask is it any wonder that they are angry? Is it any wonder my friends in Charlotte are angry when police target them and harass them? Is it any wonder they are angry when this leads to injuries and/or death?

In “The Uses of Anger” Audre Lorde wrote, “My response to racism is anger. I have lived with that anger, on that anger, beneath that anger, on top of that anger, ignoring that anger, feeding upon that anger, learning to use that anger before it laid my visions to waste, for most of my life. Once I did it in silence, afraid of the weight of that anger. My fear of that anger taught me nothing. Your fear of that anger will teach you nothing, also. Women responding to racism means women responding to anger, the anger of exclusion, of unquestioned privilege, of racial distortions, of silence, ill-use, stereotyping, defensiveness, misnaming, betrayal, and coopting”.

Anger is not always a bad thing. Anger is a powerful force and to be angry as a woman or a member of minority group is akin to being alive. I offer my solidarity to the Black Lives Matter movement and hope that they succeed in channeling anger into real and lasting change.

Valerie Denogean is MSW PAC student at ASU. She was born and raised in Tucson. She is interested in prison-reform, immigration, education-reform, politics, inequalities because of race and gender. However, currently she is interested in Eco-Feminism and how the treatment of women connects with the state of the environment, the treatment of animals, and our food. Valerie likes to run, hike and swim. She swam competitively for the Guilford College Quaker Swim team. She likes to travel and hopes to use her Social Work Degree in Northern Virginia after graduation.

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Filed under Eliminating Racism, Justice, Peace

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